Wren's Gate

A collection of gardens, nature, and celebrations of the seasons.
hqcreations:

All my coworkers know I’m really into growing food. This is how they want me to expand the office garden.
Donut seeds, hahaha!

hqcreations:

All my coworkers know I’m really into growing food. This is how they want me to expand the office garden.

Donut seeds, hahaha! image




biodiverseed:

Saving seed from members of the Cucurbitaceae family

If you are saving seed from Cucurbitaceae plants,you need to take care to avoid hybridising in order to grow the same varieties and maintain the same desirable characteristics year after year from your own seed stock. 

Like the chart I made for peppers, the above chart maps the species of Cucurbitaceae I am growing this year. You can open and download this chart or save it to a google drive at this link, and use it to chart the species you are growing in order to plan your garden.

It works like this: if two cultivars you are growing are in the same cell in your chart (ie. they are the same species), you should do one of the following:

  • Plant them far apart (1/2 kilometre)
  • Isolate them in different polytunnels
  • Put a bag over, and hand-pollinate a few flowers from each plant, mark the stems of the hand-pollinated flowers/fruits with tape, and use only those fruits for collecting seed

This way, when you plant seeds from your plant next year, they will retain all of the unique and desirable characteristics of the species and cultivar, and remain fertile and productive in perpetuity.

For example, looking at the chart from my garden, I know I can plant Kabocha Squash, Butternut Squash, Zucchini, and Bottle Gourds together with no problems; however, I will have a problem if I plant White Scallop Squash, Spaghetti Squash, and Delicata Squash too close to each other without taking precautions. 

You can usually see the species (in Latin) of the variety you are planting on the seed packet itself, under the trade or common name; or, you can write the common name in a google search and find the taxonomic information through wikipedia, gardening sites, or seed companies.

Was this information useful? Consider donating to the BiodiverSeed project to support the creation of more free, public gardening resources like these, a global bioregionalism map, a seed swap network, and a program of free seeds for low-income individuals.

- biodiverseed

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BiodiverSeed.com/tagged/garden-science

BiodiverSeed.com/tagged/resources

(via paintedgoat)

rhamphotheca:

Please Stop Feeding Bread to Waterfowl
Feeding bread to wild ducks is incredibly harmful. Bread has almost no nutrients that are useful for the duck, so they become malnourished and more susceptible to disease. Compounding the problem is that excessive bread left in the water will rot, which leads to high levels of E. coli and even botulism outbreaks. Wild ducks need to stay wild, and artificially feeding them causes them to lose their natural instincts for acquiring food. If you want to feed captive waterfowl, consider chopped vegetables, whole grains, or fruit instead. Read more: NY Dept of Environmental Conservation Photo credit: Cengland0
(via: I fucking love science)

rhamphotheca:

Please Stop Feeding Bread to Waterfowl

Feeding bread to wild ducks is incredibly harmful. Bread has almost no nutrients that are useful for the duck, so they become malnourished and more susceptible to disease. Compounding the problem is that excessive bread left in the water will rot, which leads to high levels of E. coli and even botulism outbreaks. Wild ducks need to stay wild, and artificially feeding them causes them to lose their natural instincts for acquiring food.

If you want to feed captive waterfowl, consider chopped vegetables, whole grains, or fruit instead.

Read more: NY Dept of Environmental Conservation

Photo credit: Cengland0

(via: I fucking love science)

(via bluereverie)